The AMD Ryzen 9 7900, Ryzen 7 7700, and Ryzen 5 5 7600 Review: Zen 4 Efficiency at 65 Watts

In Q3 of last year, AMD released the first CPUs based on its highly anticipated Zen 4 architecture. Not only did their Ryzen 7000 parts raise the bar in terms of performance compared with the previous Ryzen 5000 series, but it also gave birth to AMD’s latest platform, AM5. Some of the most significant benefits of Zen 4 and the AM5 platform include support for PCIe 5.0, DDR5 memory, and access to the latest and greatest of what’s available in controller sets. 

While the competition at the higher end of the x86 processor market is a metaphorical firefight with heavy weaponry, AMD has struggled to offer users on tighter budgets anything to sink their teeth into. It’s clear Zen 4 is a powerful and highly efficient architecture, but with the added cost of DDR5, finding all of the components to fit under tighter budget constraints with AM5 isn’t as easy as it once was on AM4.

AMD has launched three new processors designed to offer users on a budget something to get their money’s worth, with performance that make them favorable for users looking for Zen 4 hardware but without the hefty financial outlay. The AMD Ryzen 9 7900, Ryzen 7 7700, and Ryzen 5 7600 processors all feature the Zen 4 microarchitecture and come with a TDP of just 65 W, which makes them viable for all kinds of users, such as enthusiasts looking for a more affordable entry-point onto the AM5 platform.

Of particular interest is AMD’s new budget offering for the Ryzen 7000 series: the Ryzen 5 7600, which offers six cores/twelve threads for entry-level builders looking to build a system with all of the features of AM5 and the Ryzen 7000 family, but at a much more affordable price point. We are looking at all three of AMD’s new Ryzen 7000 65 W TDP processors to see how they stack up against the competition, to see if AMD’s lower-powered, lower-priced non-X variants can offer anything in the way of value for consumers. We also aim to see if AMD’s 65 W TDP implementation can shine on TSMC’s 5 nm node process with performance per watt efficiency that AMD claims is the best on the market.

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