Securing Digital Content: Mitigating Cybersecurity Risks in AI Content Marketing

Content marketers increasingly use artificial intelligence (AI) tools. What are some of the biggest cybersecurity risks of this approach and how can you manage them?

Data Leaks

“A December 2023 study found 31% of people who use generative AI tools had put sensitive information into them. Such behaviours could compromise clients’ data, making it more difficult to maintain trust and retain their business.” 

Data leaks happen when information exposure occurs without the permission of the person who owns or provides those details to a company. Cybercriminals can cause data leaks when they steal poorly secured content. However, many people don’t realize generative AI tools could compromise the security of confidential data.

Enterprises such as OpenAI — the name behind ChatGPT — rely on users’ prompts to train future versions of their tools. People interacting with ChatGPT must choose specific settings to prevent their conversations from becoming part of training data. It’s easy to imagine the cybersecurity ramifications of a content marketer entering confidential client information into an AI tool without knowing the potential outcomes.

A December 2023 study also found 31% of people who use generative AI tools had put sensitive information into them. Such behaviours could compromise clients’ data, making it more difficult to maintain trust and retain their business.

Successful enterprises must cater to people’s desire for convenience. However, when it comes to AI, the people working there must understand how such tools can threaten client confidentiality.

The best way to mitigate data leak risks is to teach content marketers how many AI tools work. Tell them that the content they type into the tool doesn’t necessarily stay in that interface. Then, ensure there are rules about how team members can and cannot use AI.

Stolen Credentials

“A February 2024 study indicated more than 225,000 logs sold on the dark web contained stolen ChatGPT credentials. A hacker could use those to put your company’s ChatGPT account at risk, including by using it in ways not aligned with internal protocols.” 

Many AI tools used in content marketing require logging into them. A February 2024 study found more than 225,000 logs sold on the dark web containing stolen ChatGPT credentials. A hacker could use those to put your corporate ChatGPT account at risk, including by using it in ways not aligned with internal protocols.

When you choose the associated credentials, follow all best practices for password hygiene. For example, don’t create passwords that would be easy for others to guess and never reuse passwords across multiple sites.

Another risk-mitigation strategy is to require all users to change their login information periodically. Then, even if it does get compromised, the window in which cybercriminals can use it is smaller.

Remind your content marketing team of the importance of keeping their passwords private, too. A colleague may not immediately recognize the risk of getting or giving access to an AI tool via a shared password. However, such practices circumvent security measures.

Relatedly, ensure the people with access to AI tools genuinely need them for their work. As the number of overall users increases, access control can become more difficult to manage.

Social Engineering

“Research from February 2024 revealed more than 95% of respondents felt AI-generated content created challenges for people trying to detect phishing attempts. Additionally, 81% of businesses in the study had experienced increased phishing attacks over the past year.” 

Many people are initially amazed at how fast AI tools produce content. However, once users take a closer look at the material, they see its flaws. Generative AI products can wholly fabricate statements despite seeming authoritative. They may also make up internet- or person-based sources, necessitating setting aside adequate time for fact-checking exercises.

Despite these downsides, AI-produced content looks authentic and that’s enough to encourage many cybercriminals to use it in social engineering attacks. The speed AI tools provide content at is a tempting reason for cybercriminals to rely on it to create more personalization for phishing emails and other social engineering tricks.

Research published in February 2024 showed more than 95% of respondents felt AI-produced content made it more challenging to detect phishing attempts. Additionally, 81% of businesses in the study had experienced increased phishing attacks over the past year.

Elsewhere, research from April 2023 suggests AI-generated phishing emails work well, with 78% of people opening them and 21% clicking on malicious content. Content marketers work in fast-paced settings and often juggle numerous responsibilities. Such characteristics can make these professionals more likely to believe phishing emails.

The main cybersecurity risk here is AI tools help cybercriminals create more phishing emails faster. That could mean people receive higher quantities in an average week. 

You’ve probably received advice to check potential phishing emails for telltale signs, such as spelling and capitalization errors. However, if AI can eliminate those mistakes, people must behave more cautiously to avoid becoming the next phishing victims. 

One of the best strategies is to think before acting, even if the email demands urgency. Then, you can forward the message to your IT department or even directly contact someone at the brand mentioned in the email. 

Use AI Content Tools Carefully

There are valid reasons to add AI tools to your content marketing strategy, but these products can add cybersecurity risks you didn’t anticipate. The above tips can help you address many of them and use AI to boost — rather than harm — your business.

Also Read The Real Impact of AI in the Workplace

The post Securing Digital Content: Mitigating Cybersecurity Risks in AI Content Marketing appeared first on AiiotTalk – Artificial Intelligence | Robotics | Technology.

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